The case of Public buildings (New experience approach), Meghdad Sharif

Practical investigation in architecture offices & studios

Design pedagogy & design process with aspect of new user experience With the aim of technological & fiction based model for design

The case of Public buildings (New experience approach)

Researcher: Meghdad Sharif    DEC 2018

 

Abstract

As a researcher I’m interested in practical researches that focus on development an intellectual frame work about design process that can sustain a life-long theoretical projects. Think the next generation of design pedagogy comes from the rapid changing of our life, environment and technology, this mood maybe a complex one moving forward in architecture, also we can work on a practical model of design process that based on space exploring and space documenting (in my case I would like to have cinematic-fiction approach to this documenting), generally I want to achieve a useful and functional model for design process in academic and professional studios. The outcome of this research brought about a broader question concerning the design model & tools that  help the designers and planners to empathize with the community for whom they are designing so this space exploring can be role of design in empowering today’s undeveloped spaces or even communities.

 

What i want to do?

My interest, is in research and developing practical topics related to intellectual farme-works, with specific focus on design process with ability to sustain timeless theoretical projects. Having in mind the possibility if a new generation of design pedagogy arising from rapid changing life situations, environment, and technology, this design process could be an elevation force towards a move  forward in architecture. This approach leads us to work on a design process models based on “Space Hndlnq” and “Atmosphere Exploration”. In case of this research, I would like to apply a fictional cinematic approach to document the process. My aim is to achieve a practical and imprical model for design process in academic studios and architecture offices.The outcome will bring about a broad range of solutions addressing design models & tools, enabling designers and planners to better empathize with users. The approach of “Space Finding”  can empower the role of design in underdeveloped communities.

 

For better reading see the chart in next page

rchitecture is spatial & time phenomena. A container for events of life intrinsically connected with human life. During lifespan of a human being, at least once he has been in a basic and simple architectural  environment in which has been impressed by the energy, spirit and aliveness of this environment. From the view point of architects this experience is sometimes sensory and tangible and sometimes intangible and palpable. This experience is because of events which has happened in the past or some happing at the present time. Event is and active phenomena related to active time and active space. (Kwinter, 5:2001) Space responds to events and transforms by events (Bressem 93, 2005) An event expresses itself both as the formation force of space and as a product of space. It has the  description of interaction of environment and its behaviors.

Architecture as applied art is in relation to people’s lives and is realized in response to their needs, desires, wishes and dreams. However, the issue of life creation in space is often forgotten in the process of architectural  design, because the elements shaping it are mostly hidden, non-physical and are discussed in various levels and layers. Due to this reason, the purpose of this research seeks to identify effective components information  of events that can act as effective factors in giving life to the lived space, which can be useful in understanding the architectural space as the effective human environment and presents new dimensions of space. The main  question of this research is, what events are considered life-giving events and what are the efficient factors information of them. The results show that there are three levels of life-giving components, entitled:

(1 )Features include dependence on natural process of everyday life and its spatial freedom, diversity,

 

Chart of Research plan

Research Questions

Architecture as applied art is in relation to people’s lives and is realized in response to their needs, desires, wishes and dreams. However, the issue of life creation in space is often forgotten in the process  of architectural design, because the elements shaping it are mostly hidden, non-physical and are discussed in various levels and layers. Due to this reason, the purpose of this research seeks to identify  effective components information of events that can act as effective factors in giving life to the lived space, which can be useful in understanding the architectural space as the effective human environment  and presents new dimensions of space.

 

The main questions of research listed here :

1.How we can reach to a design process model that based on new spatial experience in architecture spaces  and how with this model of design we can design many kind of experience and many kind of events in public spaces?

2.How we can categorize the atmospheric solutions of spaces and how its improve our design process?

3.which items help space of a building (public buildings) to reach its goal that planned by the architect?

4.How an Architecture can be successful in solving the problems or question of a project (public buildings)?

5.Can we create a platform encyclopedia of atmosphere in spaces with the aim of developing that

6.how we can set events in spaces during design process and what events are considered life-giving events and what are the efficient factors in formation of them?

7 .How can the architect make use of the actual physical experience of certain spaces or places and translate that to his/ her own design when designing architecture?

8.Why is learning architecture through physical experience is important?

 

Methodology

his research can be categorized as empirical and theoretical research, Experimental design. Since it was hypothesized that the combination of two independent types of stimulus properties would basically  lead to some sort of superimposition, the overall number of effective factors was expected to be a sum of the individual ones. (Russell, 1988)  the idea of design research – based on experiences from this research and the applied research approach; Research-through design. This discussion links design research to a wider philosophy of science, discussing the impetus behind conducting research from an experimental design research perspective.  Research-through-design means to investigate a subject by applying creative design methodology and experimentation to the context and subject matter of study in order to gain knowledge – and, as importantly, to investigate possible futures and potentials of this subject. Design research in this form does not only report on how the world is or have been but inquires into how the world can become. for better reading about methodology of design please see the next chart of methodology …

 

Methodology chart

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